Our property isn’t the biggest one (less than an acre) but we surely have some nice birds around to enjoy some birding activities like photographing, bird feeding, bird housing and so on.

Our lake is slowly melting away which brings along the first birds of the summer.

There is an open water area about 100 meters from our shore which my camera can just barely zoom in enough to identify some of the birds that are already swimming there.

Our lake has a lot of cranes nesting and breeding.

Cranes (Grus grus) are already starting to visit our lake as it’s melting away more every day.

We feed some birds in our yard and woodpeckers are regular visitors in our feeding place.

Woodpeckers (Dendrocopos major) seemed to enjoy our seeds for most of the winter. They are funny little birds who don’t seem to be bothered by much.

Hömötiainen visiting our bird feeding place.

This tit (Poecile) is of a more rarer family.

Töyhtötiainen visiting our feeding place.

This little tit (Lophophanes cristatus) we liked to call mohawk.

Bullfinch are visiting our feeding place in spring.

Bullfinches (Pyrrhula pyrrhula) enjoyed our seeds from the bird feeders all winter long. As the summer has gotten closer, bullfinches have gone away from our yard.

Removing bird houses before summer with ladders.

Ladders are an essential part of fixing, maintaining, placing and removing birdhouses from the trees.

Removing old nests from bird houses before summer.

It’s good to remove the old nest from inside the birdhouse already in autumn time, but at latest before the next summer. The nest is removed by simply removing the floor of the birdhouse and cleaning the inside completely.

Removing old bird’s nest from a bird house.

This is what the nest inside a birdhouse looks like when removed.

Reattached bird houses lakeside.

Two birdhouses right by the lake.

Reattached bird house hanging in the tree.

This birdhouse was placed to a completely new tree where we hadn’t had any birdhouses before.

Duck swimming in a frozen lake.

The ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) in our lake and especially next to our yard are quite shy.

Tit in a recently hang placed birdhouse building a nest.

Tit (Parus) didn’t take long before realizing our recently placed birdhouse was free for taking.

Tit in a tree.

Tits (Parus) are some of the most common birds in Finland which we’ve been feeding all winter long.

Blackbird eating from a bird feeder.

Blackbirds (Turdus merula) arrived early in the spring to our bird feeders.

Woodpecker hanging out in a tree.

Another shot of a woodpecker (Dendrocopos major) during a sunny spring day in our backyard.

Swans on a frozen lake.

Swans (Cygnus cygnus) came a little bit later this year but when they arrived they came as a whole group. Gorgeous and noisy creatures especially in spring time.